Kenya and Tanzania

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Kenya and Tanzania are often combined into one trip. Many people consider these two counties among the best places to go in Africa because they’re where you can see the Great Migration—where 2 million wildebeest, zebra, and gazelle make a migratory circle from the Masa Mara in Kenya to the Serengeti in Tanzania and back again.

Kenia & Tanzania

Tanzania is home to Mount Kilimanjaro—one of the great bucket-list hiking destinations in the entire world.

The diversity of game in Kenya is simply astounding. From the big five to the small five, Kenya’s game parks, reserves and other wildlife protection areas host some of the wildest game thus the reason why this is home for the safari. Dotted in their unique landscapes, geographical features, a vast array of game ensues.

The icing on Kenya’s wildlife cake is the annual Wildebeest Migration at the infamous Maasai Mara migration between mid-August and late October. This is the best example of wild nature at its best as hundreds of thousands of wildebeests, zebras, Thomson’s gazelles, topi and elands.

Camel Safaris

Camel Safaris are becoming an increasingly popular way to explore Kenya’s wilderness. The camel is perfectly adapted to this landscape and is widely used throughout Northern Kenya. Camels with saddles are usually used. Gifted local guides, for whom a camel train through the wilderness is a way of life accompany groups and introduce them to the bush and the local wildlife. A camel safari in Kenya is a once in a lifetime experience, riding through the bush with only the sounds of the wild and the soft tinkling of the camel bells, you will find yourself travelling at a relaxed pace, moving through the wild in tune with the rhythms of nature.

kenia safari

Mount Kenya National Park

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The World Heritage Committee inscribed Mount Kenya National Park on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1997

Mt Kenya, Africa’s second highest peak is regarded as the realm of Ngai, god of the local Kikuyu people. The mountain itself is an awe-inspiring sight with its ragged peaks, and equatorial snow.

Mount Kenya is surrounded by a belt of verdant forest that is an equally fascinating destination.

While the 5199 metre summit is a difficult technical climb, the lesser peak of Point Lenana (4985m) can be easily reached by any fit trekker. This trek takes between 3 and 5 days, through a fascinating world of forests, wildlife, unique montane vegetation including podocarpus and grounsel, and finally one of the world’s rarest sights, equatorial snow.

Tanzania

Wildlife, beaches, friendly people, fascinating cultures, Serengeti, Ngorongoro, Mt Kilimanjaro, Zanzibar Archipelago – Tanzania has all these and more wrapped up in one adventurous, welcoming package.

Serengeti National Park

On the vast plains of the Serengeti, nature’s mystery, power and beauty surround you as they do in few other places. It’s here that one of earth’s most impressive natural cycles has played itself out for aeons as hundreds of thousands of hoofed animals, driven by primeval rhythms of survival, move constantly in search of fresh grasslands.

The most famous, and numerous, are the wildebeest (of which there are some 1.5 million) and their annual migration is one of the Serengeti’s biggest draws. Besides the migrating wildebeest, there are also resident populations in the park and you’ll see these smaller but still impressive herds year-round.

In February more than 8000 wildebeest calves are born per day, although about 40% of these die before reaching four months old. A few black rhinos in the Moru Kopjes area give you a chance to glimpse all of the Big Five (lion, elephant, rhino, leopard and buffalo), although the rhinos are very rarely seen.

Ngorongoro Crater

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At 19km wide and with a surface of 264 sq km, Ngorongoro is one of the largest unbroken calderas in the world that isn’t a lake. Its steep walls soar 400m to 610m and provide the setting for an incredible natural drama, as prey and predators graze and stalk their way around the open grasslands, swamps and acacia woodland on the crater floor.

It’s such an impressive sight that, other vehicles aside, you’ll wonder whether you’ve descended into a wildlife paradise.

When to go: “Avoid the long-rains of April and May. If you’re going to catch the migration, it’s July through September,” says Daniel Saperstein, co-owner of Hippo Creek Safaris and an Africa travel specialist.